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Which Writer Wrote ANSWER

Patrick White is the answer to this week’s WWW.

She walked giddily behind him, past a rusted fuel-stove, over a field of deathly feltex.  Or ran, or slid, to keep up.  Flowers would have wilted in her hands if she hadn’t crushed them brutally, to keep her balance.  Somewhere in their private labyrinth Meg Hobgen had lost her hat.

The quote is from ‘Down at the Dump’, a tale of suburban morality, young love and the breaking out of narrow judgemental societal prisons (at least that’s my take on it).

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Which Writer Wrote ANSWER

The answer to this week’s WWW is Antonella Gambotto (now, Antonella Gambotto-Burke), a journalist and writer who first appeared on my radar when I read The eclipse: a memoir of suicide.  The eclipse is a masterful study of the effects of depression and is an homage of sorts to her brother who committed suicide.

But the quote I highlighted this week is from her first novel The Pure Weight of the Heart.

Shooting stars possess a certain grandeur for me, an almost religious significance.  I see them as symbols of a pure and nervous beauty, devoid of torment, nervous in the way of any vivid thing.  Even their names hum with the energy of other worlds – the Delta Aquarids, the Lyrids, the Orionids.  All that splendour , and such power. 

My interest in writing feature profiles led me to read Gambotto’s Lunch of Blood, a 1994 anthology with an eclectic collection of celebrity subjects, including Nick Cave, Rachel Hunter and Martin Amis.  It was enjoyable, if a little formulaic in the usual journalistic way.

The Pure Weight of the Heart however, is devastatingly deep and surprising. It follows the difficult life of astrophysicist Angelica as she searches for love and it left me with more questions than answers.

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Which Writer Wrote

Shooting stars possess a certain grandeur for me, an almost religious significance.  I see them as symbols of a pure and nervous beauty, devoid of torment, nervous in the way of any vivid thing.  Even their names hum with the energy of other worlds – the Delta Aquarids, the Lyrids, the Orionids.  All that splendour , and such power.  

Check in on Sunday for the answer

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WHICH WRITER WROTE

We’ve had poetry and fiction.  Now, this week’s WWW features song lyrics.

Take the dawn of the day
And give it away
To someone who can fill the part
Of the dream we once held

Have a guess and check in on Sunday for the Answer

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WHICH WRITER WROTE Answer

The answer to this week’s WWW is Gig Ryan.

Women are full of compassion and have soft soggy hearts
you can throw up in and no-one’ll notice
and they won’t complain.  I’d shoot the man
who thinks he can look like an excavation-site
but you can’t, who thinks what you look like’s for him
to appraise, to sit back, to talk his intelligent way.

 The quote comes from ‘If I had a Gun’, a poem with capital A Attitude in both subject matter and in poetic form.  It’s tone is defiant and hostile and the colloquial language gives it a modern popular edge, emphasised by the odd swear word.

Gig Ryan is an award winning Melbourne poet,   She was given the name Elizabeth when she was born in 1956 and I’d love to know when and why she changed her name to Gig. Can anyone enlighten me?

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WHICH WRITER WROTE

This week’s WWW features a poet.

Women are full of compassion and have soft soggy hearts
you can throw up in and no-one’ll notice
and they won’t complain.  I’d shoot the man
who thinks he can look like an excavation-site
but you can’t, who thinks what you look like’s for him
to appraise, to sit back, to talk his intelligent way.

Have a guess and visit this site on Sunday for the answer.

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WHICH WRITER WROTE Answer

The answer to this week’s WWW is Kate Grenville, award-winning author of such masterpieces as The Secret River (2005) and Lillian’s Story (1985).

Were they still laughing at some silly women’s joke? Or was it possible – was it conceivable? – that they were at this moment winking at each other, and laughing not at some frilly little schoolgirl joke, but at me, the man, the one who did not know things that they knew…Pride forbade me to turn around and squint into the light, but the air in front of my face grew dark and the muscles of my face froze.  I closed the door on them with loathing: a loathing born of despair.

This passage comes from Grenville’s Dark Places which was published in 1994.

The narrator, Albion Gidley Singer, is both repulsive and sympathetic.  He is indeed a man of many layers of dark and darker places…certainly there is not much that is light within him.  But he is a creature of his milieu, initially adopting the traits that one of his ‘station’ perhaps ought to have had but eventually taking them beyond the norm.

It is – by turns – a laugh out loud story and a disturbing and shocking study of one man’s psyche.  I loved every word of it.

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