The Trouble With Flying and other stories: Book Review

Kate Rotherham’s ‘Potholes’ is a standout piece in the 2014 Margaret River Short Story Competition collection (The Trouble With Flying and other stories).  Perhaps it has something to do with its upbeat humour amongst some melancholy, introspective stories.  Maybe it is the even pace. Or the originality. I suspect it is all of these things and much more.

Harry has read a magazine article entitled ‘Ten ways to a happier life’ and these numbered suggestions (such as express yourself creatively and find your passion) thread their way in and out of ‘Potholes’.  Harry does indeed find a way to express himself creatively and ticks another of the recommendations by practis[ing] senseless acts of beauty.

Harry’s father Les is one of those in-my-day, too-busy-working kind of dads common to his milieu who’s “never met a child yet who didn’t have ADHD” (127).  After retirement, Les was bombarded with options, all of which he declined to embrace; his response to the idea of a Wednesday evening watercolour class being “I’d rather stab myself in the eyeball with a fork” (129), and when he finds an excuse to visit his old workplace he realises that, without him, the place has become “officially Aspergers Central” (129).

‘Potholes’ is a beautiful, uplifting, original story that made me laugh.  I find myself thinking about Harry as I go about mundane tasks. It is pleasant to be reminded of the possibility of beauty in the prosaic.

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I have had a soft-spot for Margaret River Press since I reviewed their first collection in 2012, followed up by a review of the 2013 competition collection as well as their first full-length work of fiction, Finding Jasper by Lynne Leonhardt.

There’s always something a little bit quirky to love about the actual printing of the books. In the case of this 2014 collection, it’s the beautiful bird headpiece that ‘plumbs’ onto the reverse and flows through the book in the form of arty section breaks. Both the impressive cover and the text design are by Susan Miller. Clever.  Perfect.

Back to the stories . . .

Claire Aman gets a nod for the originality she conjured in ‘Zone of Confidence’, a love story written with the same chutzpah afforded its spunky protagonist. I delighted in this poetic sentence I found hidden amongst more direct text: “At least there are no clouds marauding in the sky, only a white daytime moon tossed up high” (176).

‘My House’ by Rachelle Rechichi tells the story of a family in the grips of despair and, while seemingly vulnerable, there is a deep underlying strength evident in the narrator, May.  Strangely, the tale is ultimately uplifting.  I think it is because of the survival instinct we can read into May’s personality.

Melanie Kinsman’s ‘A Paper Woman’ is a poignant tale of a narrator battling disease. The story opens with a punch:

Before you came I spent a bitter winter.  My heart froze in my chest. The hospital sheets lay thin and flat against my ribcage. My breasts had been cut off, and a slash of a scar lay in their place. (228)

Kinsman’s words cut precisely to the heart of illness and its surrounding accoutrements, the narrator’s hospital stay a “macabre vacation” (230) from her usual life as she felt like a “fledgling woman: unmade, unfinished, an amputee” (230).  She later describes herself as “a paper woman, thin and flammable”, to which her lover’s gaze is a match (235).

In ‘Tear Along the Dotted Lines’, Melanie Napthine uses clever simile, metaphor and imagery.

  • Ants that might be attracted by food left out … “would have the bench coated in them, a sheet of shifting black like the hair of a drowned girl” (269)
  • A watermarked ceiling sports a “swinging nude globe blindly supervising” (270)
  • A “train arrives, with a difficult slowing that its cool silver skin contradicts” (267-8)

I thoroughly enjoyed Glen Hunting’s ‘Martha and the Lesters’.  The story tackles a difficult theme with great humour.  It’s narrated by Roland (his family was “fairly progressive by wheatbelt standards” (304)) who lodges with the feisty Martha and a collection of spiders who Martha says don’t love her. “They’re only here for the books.  I’m certain they come down and pore over them at night when I’m asleep” (305).

Anyone who has suffered severe pain will likely relate to the protagonist’s predicament in the simply and aptly titled ‘Dying’ (Bindy Pritchard). “She learnt how to chase her pain, dip under it and fly beside it until it fitted her body perfectly.” (338)

It is interesting that, of my favourites singled out in this review, Pritchard and Rechichi are the only prize-winners (Pritchard scored second place for ‘Dying’ and Rechichi won the prize for the best story from a South West resident with her story ‘My House’).  That’s why I enjoy short story collections. You might not love all the stories but there are usually some that resonate.  And there’s lots to love in this collection. I even enjoyed the introduction (quite out of character for me) by Richard Rossiter and Susan Midalia.

So there you go . . . my love affair with Margaret River Press continues.

Check out their website where you can purchase The Trouble with Flying and other publications, find stockists, and read about forthcoming events.

The winning entry in this 2014 competition is, as the title of the book suggests, ‘The Trouble with Flying’ (a coming of age tale) by Ruth Wyer. Congratulations to the Sydney-based ‘fledgling’ writer. When you purchase the book, make sure you check out her bio which is quite a hoot. 

BOOK DETAIL
The Trouble with Flying and other stories. Ed. Richard Rossiter with Susan Midalia, Margaret River Press, Witchcliffe, WA, 2014.
ISBN 978-0-9875615-2-7

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13 Comments

Filed under Reviews

13 responses to “The Trouble With Flying and other stories: Book Review

  1. Susan Miller

    Glad you liked the design!

  2. Glen Hunting

    Thanks so much for your vote of confidence, Karenlee. Very much appreciated.

  3. Welcome to my humble ‘abode’ Glen. I confess that I laughed out loud when reading your story and I grew very fond of the Lesters.

  4. Hi Karenlee, thank you so much for your lovely review. You’ve made my day! So glad to have found your little corner of the web and, as they say in the classics, ‘I’ll be back’. Wishing you a snug winter of great reading.

  5. This was a fantastic review, I’ll be ordering “Potholes” today! I’m also going to check out “Tear along the Dotted Lines.” So, thanks.

    So, what can I do to get you to review “Lost in Spain?”

  6. Ha, I didn’t notice this come through my feed karenlee. I’ve finally read and reviewed it too. It’s a great collection I agree. I love that Margaret River Press is doing this. How I wish more people would read short stories.

    • Just read your review Sue and loved it. You are right to mention that all the stories have something to offer and all the writers should be commended. Like you, I’ve singled out my favourites which is the nature of the beast. As a writer myself, I know the joy is in having your work published and read and, for that, we thank Margaret River Press and others like them for bringing us such great collections.

  7. Yes, I had more faves too. Just can’t do them all justice. Good idea though, to do a post per theme. Or maybe we can even bring one story out from time to time and give it a bit of space to fly alone!

    • Yes, that’s another approach. As you probably know I do sometimes do individual short stories and wondered about doing a few from this down the track, but I will probably get caught up with the next thing methinks.

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